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hdhEnews

hdhEnews issue: April 21, 2016

Inside this issue:

$200,000 in funding supports world-class research lab at Hotel Dieu 

“Fabulous” new technologies boost diagnostic capabilities of eye clinic

Simple blood test can identify your risk for type 1 diabetes

Awesome speaker in town for 2016 Leadership Breakfast

Inspiring hospital volunteers win community award 


 $200,000 in funding supports world-class research lab at Hotel Dieu 

One of the few facilities in the world capable of directly measuring the human skeleton in motion is coming to Hotel Dieu Hospital, a highly sophisticated research lab geared to developing clinical interventions that account for a patient’s individual anatomy, mechanics and activities.
 
Construction on the world-class High-Speed Skeletal Imaging (HSSI) Laboratory starts this summer, funded in part by $200,000 just awarded to lead researcher Dr. Michael Rainbow from the Canada Foundation for Innovation’s (CFI’s) John R. Evans Leaders Fund.
 
The 1500-square-foot lab will be affiliated with the Human Mobility Research Centre (HMRC), a partnership between Queen’s University and Kingston General Hospital, and it will augment two adjacent Queen’s labs at Hotel Dieu—the Human Mobility Research Laboratory and the Neuroscience Clinical Testing Laboratory.
 
An assistant professor in the Queen's Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering and an HMRC faculty member, Rainbow says being able to measure the motion of virtually any joint in the body—for example, the motion of the knee while a person is running—opens the door to developing treatments and preventative strategies that could ultimately improve quality of life across a spectrum of patients, from the athlete plagued by overuse injuries to seniors coping with osteoarthritis.
 
“By using very sophisticated imaging and modelling techniques we can collect data about joint mechanics that could, for example, allow orthopedic surgeons to determine ahead of time if a patient would respond better to rehabilitation or surgery,” he says.  
 
“The goal is to develop interventions that account for each patient’s particular anatomy, mechanics and activities.”
 
The new lab will feature force plates to measure ground reaction forces and an optical motion capture system to visualize the body in motion.  
 
“The lab is a wonderful example of multiple disciplines—including mechanical and materials engineering, surgery, orthopedics—collaborating to reduce the debilitating effects of musculoskeletal injuries,” says Rainbow. 
 
“This research will advance our knowledge about determining injury thresholds, which will then help clinicians to create corrective and preventative interventions tailored to the individual.  Our vision is to facilitate healthy aging and independence by helping to ensure that people maintain their mobility as they grow older.”
 
 

 

“Fabulous” new technologies boost diagnostic capabilities of eye clinic

Patient at ultra-widefield cameraNext-generation imaging technologies with the potential to transform our understanding of eye disease are giving ophthalmic specialists at Hotel Dieu Hospital their best diagnostic tools yet.
 
Dr. Martin ten Hove, head of the ophthalmology department at Hotel Dieu and Queen’s University, is excited about the recent acquisition of a new Optos ultra-widefield camera that allows physicians to see up to 82 per cent of the retina, about 50 per cent more than before.  In addition, the camera’s images capture the various depths of the retina by using three different coloured lasers, providing exquisite details about each of the cellular layers in the eye.
  
Ten Hove says the new system dramatically boosts the amount of information about the retina, the delicate wallpaper on the back surface of the eye that receives what we see and converts it to nerve signals for the brain.  
 
“With ultra-wide field optics we have the largest field of view ever, including the far periphery of the retina, which was previously very difficult to image,” he explains.  “Being able to see more means we can detect the early signs of retinal disease—for example, vasculitis, diabetes and some cancers—faster, treat patients sooner and ultimately save someone’s sight.
 
“The system is also more comfortable for patients.  Before photographers took seven or more bright-flash photos, which was time-consuming for the patient and posed problems in terms of montaging those images together.  Now we can grab a single panoramic retinal image in less than a second.”
 
The ophthalmology department is also set to invest in new OCT software that will produce fantastically clear, 3D images of retinal blood vessels without the need for patients to have an injection of contrast dye.
 
Eye specialists typically evaluate the functioning of retinal vessels through a diagnostic test called fluorescein angiography which involves injecting contrast dye in a patient’s arm.  The dye travels up to the eye within a few seconds and lights up the retinal blood vessels and structure, helping the physician to spot problems such as diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration and retinal tumours.
 
“We know that some patients can have an allergic reaction to the dye,” says ten Hove, “so we’re adding this new, dye-less Zeiss OCT [Optical Coherence Tomography] system.  It’s a safe, non-invasive test that will be more comfortable for patients while giving us excellent information about blood vessels and allowing us to infer information about blood flow in the retina.”
 
Ten Hove says OCT angiography may soon become the new standard for imaging retinal vascular disorders, and that acquiring the system, along with the new Optos ultra wide-field camera, is critical for his department to keep pace with the fast-moving field of high resolution ophthalmic imaging.
 
“These are fabulous new technologies that have the potential to transform our understanding of eye disease in virtually every subspecialty,” he says. 
 
“We’re all about providing the absolute best care for our patients, while at the same time making novel scientific observations that will advance the future of ophthalmology.”
 
Photo:  By using three different-coloured lasers, the new Optos ultra-widefield camera provides exquisite details about each of the cellular layers in the eye.
 
 

 

Simple blood test can identify your risk for type 1 diabetes

UFamily having a picnic.sing a simple blood test, the TrialNet Type 1 Diabetes Research Group is screening relatives of people with Type 1 diabetes to find out if these family members are at risk for developing the disease.  Eligible participants can book an appointment now for screening at Hotel Dieu Hospital on Tuesday, May 3.
 
Why get screened? 
  • Screening is the first step on the pathway to prevention – those who test positive may be eligible to join research studies testing ways to delay and prevent the disease.
  • Participants in the study who are at higher risk are closely monitored for the earliest signs of type 1 diabetes; early diagnosis can lead to better health outcomes.
  • Participation in research helps give scientists a better understanding of what causes diabetes which may help prevent or cure this disease one day.
 
Who can participate?
  • First-degree relatives (siblings, parents, children) of people with type 1 diabetes   between the ages of 1 – 45 OR
  • Second-degree relatives (aunts/uncles, cousins, grandchildren) of people with type 1 diabetes between the ages of 1– 20. 
  • Also invited are previous participants of the TrialNet Natural History Study who are due for their annual rescreen blood draw. Children under the age of 18 who previously screened negative are eligible to be rescreened on an annual basis.
 
What’s involved?
  • Screening involves a simple blood test. There is no cost for the test and no special preparation is necessary.  
 
Where and when do I go?
  • The screening takes place at the Children’s Outpatient Centre, Hotel Dieu Hospital, 166 Brock St., Kingston ON from 4 to 7:30pm, Tuesday, May 3, 2016.
 
If you are interested in attending the screening event please call: 
The Canadian TrialNet Study Team 
Toll-Free: 1-866-699-1899 Email: trialnet.diabetes@sickkids.ca 
If you are not able to attend the screening event, it is still possible to participate. Please call for more information on alternative ways to be screened.
 

 

Awesome speaker in town for 2016 Leadership Breakfast

Neil PasrichaBestselling author of The Book of Awesome and The Happiness Equation, Neil Pasricha, will be sharing his insights into living the happy life—great early morning fare—at the Hotel Dieu Hospital annual Leadership Breakfast on Thursday, May 19 at the Ramada Kingston Hotel and Conference Centre (formerly Days Inn).  
 
A Harvard MBA, New York Times bestselling author and world’s most sought-after speakers, Pasricha has the gift of connecting with audiences and challenging them to boost their expectations and commit to finding happiness in their lives and world every day.  Along with a delicious buffet breakfast, attendees at the Leadership Breakfast will be learning about the keys to happiness!  Proceeds from the event will benefit the Chronic Pain Clinic at Hotel Dieu.
 
The Leadership Breakfast runs 6:30-9:30 am.  Early-bird tickets (before May 1) cost $100; after that date tickets will cost $110.  Tickets can be purchased online at www.uhkf.ca, by calling 613-549-5452 ext. 5915 or by visiting the University Hospitals Kingston Foundation at 55 Rideau Street, Suite 4, Kingston, ON.
 
Limited copies of Parsricha’s newest book—The Happiness Equation—are available for pre-order for $20 (45% savings) with ticket purchase.
 

 

Inspiring hospital volunteers win community award 

Ryan, Kelly, Dawn and Leona accepting their awardA small but mighty group of Kingston volunteers took home a special award during the 2016 National Volunteer Week, recognition of their long commitment and inspirational presence at Hotel Dieu Hospital.
 
Receiving the Volunteers Grow Community Award from the United Way KFLA Volunteer Centre is the three-person strong team of Kelly, Ryan and Dawn, all adults with developmental disabilities who land weekly at Hotel Dieu to prepare patient information and education kits. In 2015 alone, the team helped to assemble more than 22,000 kits, and collectively they have logged close to 3000 volunteer hours over the last 12 years.
 
Putting together the multi-page information kits demands great attention to detail and steady teamwork, says Leona Sanders, the staff person who accompanies the trio from Ongwanada, the community organization that supports about 600 people with developmental disabilities in our region.  
 
Sanders coordinates her small team’s tasks each week.  “They always get the job done,” she says, “and they take huge pride in their work.”  As well, the volunteers brush up their social skills as they move through the hospital making deliveries or sharing a snack break with staff.  
 
Hotel Dieu treasures its relationship with the winning team, says Lynda Laird, Manager of Volunteer Resources, because each member is making a significant contribution to the hospital’s patients and staff while engaging in meaningful work and staying active. 
 
“It’s clearly a win-win relationship,” she says. “Ryan, Dawn and Kelly love their volunteer work here and are beloved by staff and volunteers alike who look forward to seeing them each Thursday morning.  
 
“They inspire us all.  They’re unique individuals with some challenges, but with the right support and guidance they’re able to be incredibly successful in their volunteer work.  They remind us each week that we all have a contribution to make to our community—it’s just a matter of finding the right fit.”
 
The Ongwanada volunteers received their award at special City Hall ceremony on April 11 when the United Way KFLA Volunteer Centre honoured people in our region who generously give their time and spirit as volunteers in our community.
 
Photo:  A winning team:  HDH volunteers Ryan, Ongwanada staffer Leona Sanders, Kelly and Dawn