Nutrition Tips

What’s the difference between probiotic and prebiotic?

Let’s first break things down so we can digest this information (pun intended).

Our gut is a giant host to millions of bacteria with approximately 300 to 500 bacterial species!  In fact, the number of bacteria within the gut is almost ten times that of all the cells in the human body (talk about a wild party!). These bacteria have multiple roles within the digestive system that help you digest food and absorb essential vitamins. However, when your system is disturbed, it can lead to digestive issues. This is where your probiotics and prebiotics come in!

Cooking for Camping

Hot dogs, chips, marshmallows, bacon, watermelon …

Yes, we understand. There are memories, traditions and conveniences to consider when it comes to camping fare. But we don’t need to compromise a healthy lifestyle for a few days or weeks of vacation fun. A body’s need for healthy food never goes on vacation. It may take some extra planning and a step outside of the food comfort zone, but these healthy camping options will keep your taste buds happy for your next campground cookout.

Breakfast

Constipation Problems? Try Insoluble Fibre

Fibre is an important part of having a healthy diet, but if you are having constipation problems, it’s best to turn to insoluble fibre.

So, you’ve decided to go vegan. But, what about protein?

Needless to say, protein plays a significant role within our body. Known as the “building blocks” of life, protein is responsible for our skin, cartilage, hair and nails. It also helps form important enzymes, hormones, and new tissues within our body. Most notably, protein helps build and maintain our muscles, and forms red blood cells to carry oxygen to all parts of our body. Our body requires 20 amino acids, the most basic units of protein, in order to carry out body functions.

Easy, Balanced Breakfast

Consuming a healthy meal in the busy morning may take less time than you think when you are prepared. Take a look at some of these simple, balanced breakfast suggestions.

On the go? Mix these ingredients in a blender for a simple yet delicious smoothie

  • 125 mL (½ cup) water or 100% fruit juice
  • 125 mL (½ cup) fresh or frozen fruit
  • 175 g (¾ cup) yogurt
  • 15 mL (1 Tbsp) skim milk powder

Want to warm up? Use quick-cooking oats to make a heart-warming bowl of oatmeal. Enjoy with a glass of milk or water.

I’m addicted to food.

We’ve heard it before: people can live without alcohol or tobacco but no one can go a day without food. For many folks, the thought of changing typical food choices or eating habits can evoke anxiety and fear. A feeling of I can’t live without.

Even when I look at food, I start to gain weight.

If you’ve ever struggled with weight or body image issues, this is a familiar grumble. It’s acting in defeat and surrendering your own worth without first acknowledging your patience, determination and value.

Spot the problem: When we believe our thoughts more than our rational mind, we lose the fight before we begin. Kindness, understanding and self-respect go a long way in sustaining behaviour change.

Whoa! Hold the carbs … don’t those make me gain weight?

It is almost daily that a patient explains ‘I can’t eat carbs … they make me gain weight’ or laments ‘the only time I’ve been successful in weight loss is when I’ve followed a high protein diet … when I added back the carbs, all the weight came back.’

This is a true fight with food. It’s frustrating, disheartening and defeating. More than that, it’s misinformed.

Take the Fight out of Food! Spot the problem. Get the Facts. Seek Support.

Every March, Dietitians of Canada campaigns to bring health and nutrition issues to the attention of Canadians. This year, dietitians across Canada are encouraging you to improve your relationship with food, no matter the struggle.  We want to encourage you to enjoy eating and to move past frustration and confusion. 

If you’re fighting with food, try out this 3-step approach:

1. Spot the problem: Define what’s causing your fight with food.

2. Get the facts: Use facts from credible sources to decide what needs to be done to solve the problem.

Take control of your sweet tooth!

Do you find it difficult to concentrate mid-day with a sugar craving? Are you searching the cupboards in the evening to satisfy that sweet tooth? What appeases it? Chocolate? Baked goods? Desserts?

Your sweet tooth can be managed with awareness, attention, and some coping tools.

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