Nutrition Tips

Constipation Problems? Try Insoluble Fibre

Fibre is an important part of having a healthy diet, but if you are having constipation problems, it’s best to turn to insoluble fibre.

So, you’ve decided to go vegan. But, what about protein?

Needless to say, protein plays a significant role within our body. Known as the “building blocks” of life, protein is responsible for our skin, cartilage, hair and nails. It also helps form important enzymes, hormones, and new tissues within our body. Most notably, protein helps build and maintain our muscles, and forms red blood cells to carry oxygen to all parts of our body. Our body requires 20 amino acids, the most basic units of protein, in order to carry out body functions.

Easy, Balanced Breakfast

Consuming a healthy meal in the busy morning may take less time than you think when you are prepared. Take a look at some of these simple, balanced breakfast suggestions.

On the go? Mix these ingredients in a blender for a simple yet delicious smoothie

  • 125 mL (½ cup) water or 100% fruit juice
  • 125 mL (½ cup) fresh or frozen fruit
  • 175 g (¾ cup) yogurt
  • 15 mL (1 Tbsp) skim milk powder

Want to warm up? Use quick-cooking oats to make a heart-warming bowl of oatmeal. Enjoy with a glass of milk or water.

I’m addicted to food.

We’ve heard it before: people can live without alcohol or tobacco but no one can go a day without food. For many folks, the thought of changing typical food choices or eating habits can evoke anxiety and fear. A feeling of I can’t live without.

Take the Fight out of Food! Spot the problem. Get the Facts. Seek Support.

Every March, Dietitians of Canada campaigns to bring health and nutrition issues to the attention of Canadians. This year, dietitians across Canada are encouraging you to improve your relationship with food, no matter the struggle.  We want to encourage you to enjoy eating and to move past frustration and confusion. 

If you’re fighting with food, try out this 3-step approach:

1. Spot the problem: Define what’s causing your fight with food.

2. Get the facts: Use facts from credible sources to decide what needs to be done to solve the problem.

Take control of your sweet tooth!

Do you find it difficult to concentrate mid-day with a sugar craving? Are you searching the cupboards in the evening to satisfy that sweet tooth? What appeases it? Chocolate? Baked goods? Desserts?

Your sweet tooth can be managed with awareness, attention, and some coping tools.

Embrace the tastes of Fall

Hello fall. We’ve missed you (and your tasty invitation to use the oven and stove once again). Fall is an absolute splendor for fresh foods and cooking inspiration. A time for harvest and preservation. Warm up today and enjoy the flavours of our favourite fall meals:

Wake up and put the caffeine to the side

You may think it is impossible, but you can survive a life without caffeine.   If you are considering bariatric surgery, this is an absolute must.

Along with alcohol, carbonated beverages and non-prescription and illicit drugs, the Ontario Bariatric Network  advises all patients to avoid caffeine for a minimum 2 months prior and lifelong following bariatric surgery.

So, why the pass by your favorite coffee shop?

What did you really eat?

Do you really know how you are nourishing your body?

Take, for example, this 24-hour food and beverage recall:

Breakfast:  1 whole wheat bagel with cream cheese, a glass of orange juice, coffee with milk

Morning snack:  banana muffin, coffee with milk

Lunch:  tuna sandwich on whole wheat bread, handful of chocolate-covered raisins, handful of grapes

Afternoon:  2x 500ml water

Snack while making supper: carrot sticks, crackers, cheddar cheese

The Sunshine Vitamin (aka VitaminD)

Vitamin D is one of the most common nutrient deficiencies that we see in our patients. You may be familiar with this as the sunshine vitamin. It has roles in maintaining healthy bones, teeth and muscles as well as keeping our immune system healthy. It may even have roles in preventing certain types of cancer. Over time, low vitamin D can contribute to osteomalacia (softening bones) or osteoporosis (weak, porous bones).

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