Motivation

Self-Monitoring: The Benefits of Writing Things Down

Writing down your daily meals and snacks can sometimes feel like a chore. But did you know that it comes with a pack of benefits?

What is self-monitoring?
Self-monitoring is the act of observing and recording your behaviours and practices (think food, activity, moods) to help you reflect and change your behaviours. Some common self-monitoring tools include food diaries, food recalls, exercise logs, or equipment such as pedometers. 

Navigating Social Media

The Facebook site said …

I’m a part of the online community network and they suggest …

I’ve been supplementing with (____) because someone on the peer network used it …

This is simply a snapshot into the ‘doctor internet’ comments that we receive in our daily practice at the bariatric clinic. Indeed, we support the strong network of peer support for bariatric patients. However, we must advise caution about sharing and receiving health advice online and with peers.
When engaging in online discussions and forums, consider:

Defuse the negative

Here in the bariatric clinic, we are home to some of the most vulnerable conversations that folks will have. We open up discussions about raw, human experiences around body, weight and food.

Cooking for Camping

Hot dogs, chips, marshmallows, bacon, watermelon …

Yes, we understand. There are memories, traditions and conveniences to consider when it comes to camping fare. But we don’t need to compromise a healthy lifestyle for a few days or weeks of vacation fun. A body’s need for healthy food never goes on vacation. It may take some extra planning and a step outside of the food comfort zone, but these healthy camping options will keep your taste buds happy for your next campground cookout.

Breakfast

I’m addicted to food.

We’ve heard it before: people can live without alcohol or tobacco but no one can go a day without food. For many folks, the thought of changing typical food choices or eating habits can evoke anxiety and fear. A feeling of I can’t live without.

Even when I look at food, I start to gain weight.

If you’ve ever struggled with weight or body image issues, this is a familiar grumble. It’s acting in defeat and surrendering your own worth without first acknowledging your patience, determination and value.

Spot the problem: When we believe our thoughts more than our rational mind, we lose the fight before we begin. Kindness, understanding and self-respect go a long way in sustaining behaviour change.

Whoa! Hold the carbs … don’t those make me gain weight?

It is almost daily that a patient explains ‘I can’t eat carbs … they make me gain weight’ or laments ‘the only time I’ve been successful in weight loss is when I’ve followed a high protein diet … when I added back the carbs, all the weight came back.’

This is a true fight with food. It’s frustrating, disheartening and defeating. More than that, it’s misinformed.

Take the Fight out of Food! Spot the problem. Get the Facts. Seek Support.

Every March, Dietitians of Canada campaigns to bring health and nutrition issues to the attention of Canadians. This year, dietitians across Canada are encouraging you to improve your relationship with food, no matter the struggle.  We want to encourage you to enjoy eating and to move past frustration and confusion. 

If you’re fighting with food, try out this 3-step approach:

1. Spot the problem: Define what’s causing your fight with food.

2. Get the facts: Use facts from credible sources to decide what needs to be done to solve the problem.

Healthy Hibernation

Make your day a little bit harder

When it comes to being physically active, anything and everything counts! You don’t necessarily need to devote a block of time every day exclusively for physical fitness. Make your day a little bit harder by parking farther away from buildings, taking the stairs, walking to speak to a colleague instead of e-mailing or going for a walk on your lunch break.

Wake up and put the caffeine to the side

You may think it is impossible, but you can survive a life without caffeine.   If you are considering bariatric surgery, this is an absolute must.

Along with alcohol, carbonated beverages and non-prescription and illicit drugs, the Ontario Bariatric Network  advises all patients to avoid caffeine for a minimum 2 months prior and lifelong following bariatric surgery.

So, why the pass by your favorite coffee shop?

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